Quantcast

Camacho: Mosby is short in drive to force primary

Norwalk Board of Education member Shirley Mosby. (File photo)

Updated 3:55 p.m.: Explanation from Stuart Wells, headline changed

NORWALK, Conn. —Board of Education member Shirley Mosby has fallen short in her drive to force a Democratic primary, Democratic Town Committee Chairman Ed Camacho said Monday.

Democratic Registrar Stuart Wells on Tuesday explained that he is giving Mosby a chance to help him find names that are indecipherable on the petitions. If she is still short, Mosby will nevertheless be on the ballot as a Working Families Party candidate.

Camacho’s comment came in an absence of information from the registrar’s office. Wells had not returned multiple emails and a phone call asking about the status of his effort to verify the signatures turned in by Mosby’s team Wednesday. Mosby did not respond to efforts to contact her Monday.

On Tuesday, Wells said:

“Shirley is 112 signatures short at the moment. All the pages have been reviewed, but there are about 100 names I could not read or could not find and I am giving Shirley the opportunity to help me find those names. She or her circulators may be able to remember who the person was, and supply me with the name. Of course it would still have to match the petition, but handwriting can be difficult to decipher, and sometimes knowing what to look for can help a lot. For example, the letters “ol” can easily look like the letter “d” – there are many other possible example. I don’t need a lot of letters to find someone (if they are on the list), but I do need the first letter(s).

“Also, it is always possible that I made some other error(s), and that Shirley could find them. However, as you can tell from the numbers given, she needs to find quite a few changes (errors and additions) in order to affect the outcome.”

Mosby failed to get a Democratic endorsement for her reelection bid, and sought the endorsement through a primary. She needed 942 signatures and her team turned in 1,146, Wells said last week.

“My understanding is that Ms. Mosby fell short by slightly over 100 signatures,” Camacho said in a Monday evening email.

The Working Families Party on Monday announced its endorsed candidates, a list which includes Mosby.

Mosby needed about an 80 percent success rate in the validation process but petitions has been running at 75 percent, Wells said last week.

Signatures are ruled out if they are duplicated on other petitions, if they are not from registered Democrats and if their addresses do not match their registration, he explained. Wells said he thought he could process the signatures in two or three days; Republican Registrar Karen Doyle Lyons has been out sick and unavailable to assist in eliminating duplicates.

Mosby could have chosen to get on the general election ballot via a petitioning candidate slot. That would have required far less signatures; at large Council candidates needed 135 signatures.

Her team on Wednesday objected to the skepticism Wells’ expressed toward her petitions.

“If (Wells) rigged it he’s going to be in trouble,” said John Mosby, Shirley Mosby’s father, last week.

Wells has done an awesome job, Town Clerk Rick McQuaid said Thursday.

“Let them come in and see a whole day’s work. It’s not just doing this,” McQuaid said. “He has worked both sides and he’s been more than cordial to every single candidate that’s been running for anything, including someone who wanted to get on the ballot for the Republicans. He’s guided Working Families in the right direction…. He’s checking 1,100 names and not everybody has good penmanship.”

A city-wide primary would cost Norwalk $60,000, McQuaid said. There will be a Democratic primary in District A, but McQuaid characterized that as relatively minor, with only four polling places to keep track of.

Mosby had different teams collecting signatures, which made it more probable that people signed twice, Wells said last week.

Mosby last week said, “Whether I win or lose I’ve got such insight into what the people out there are saying. There are so many different issues that are out there. We all think the ‘Board of Ed’ is great but these people have individual issues.”

 

Original story:

Camacho: Mosby has failed to force a primary

NORWALK, Conn. —Board of Education member Shirley Mosby has fallen short in her drive to force a Democratic primary, Democratic Town Committee Chairman Ed Camacho said Monday.

She will nevertheless be on the ballot as a Working Families Party candidate.

Camacho’s comment comes in an absence of information from the registrar’s office. Democratic Registrar Stuart Wells has not returned multiple emails and a phone call asking about the status of his effort to verify the signatures turned in by Mosby’s team Wednesday. Mosby did not respond to efforts to contact her Monday.

Mosby failed to get a Democratic endorsement for her reelection bid, and sought the endorsement through a primary. She needed 942 signatures and her team turned in 1,146, Wells said last week.

“My understanding is that Ms. Mosby fell short by slightly over 100 signatures,” Camacho said in a Monday evening email.

The Working Families Party on Monday announced its endorsed candidates, a list which includes Mosby.

Mosby needed about an 80 percent success rate in the validation process but petitions has been running at 75 percent, Wells said last week.

Signatures are ruled out if they are duplicated on other petitions, if they are not from registered Democrats and if their addresses do not match their registration, he explained. Wells said he thought he could process the signatures in two or three days; Republican Registrar Karen Doyle Lyons has been out sick and unavailable to assist in eliminating duplicates.

Mosby could have chosen to get on the general election ballot via a petitioning candidate slot. That would have required far less signatures; at large Council candidates needed 135 signatures.

Her team on Wednesday objected to the skepticism Wells’ expressed toward her petitions.

“If (Wells) rigged it he’s going to be in trouble,” said John Mosby, Shirley Mosby’s father, last week.

Wells has done an awesome job, Town Clerk Rick McQuaid said Thursday.

“Let them come in and see a whole day’s work. It’s not just doing this,” McQuaid said. “He has worked both sides and he’s been more than cordial to every single candidate that’s been running for anything, including someone who wanted to get on the ballot for the Republicans. He’s guided Working Families in the right direction…. He’s checking 1,100 names and not everybody has good penmanship.”

A city-wide primary would cost Norwalk $60,000, McQuaid said. There will be a Democratic primary in District A, but McQuaid characterized that as relatively minor, with only four polling places to keep track of.

Mosby had different teams collecting signatures, which made it more probable that people signed twice, Wells said last week.

Mosby last week said, “Whether I win or lose I’ve got such insight into what the people out there are saying. There are so many different issues that are out there. We all think the ‘Board of Ed’ is great but these people have individual issues.”

3 comments

Rick McQuaid August 15, 2017 at 7:57 am

I believe $20,000 – $25,000 would be the number for a primary not the $60,000 that was reported.

Donna August 15, 2017 at 2:33 pm

This is the first we’ve heard from Ed Camacho in some time. He has a house for sale across the street from 17 Quintard but was oddly silent throughout the ZBA hearongs. Now that the dust has settled, I guess he figures it’s safe to come out. With luck the translation will close before the Firetree cases light up the local news again.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

About this site

NancyOnNorwwalk.com was conceived as the place to go for Norwalk residents to get the real, unvarnished story about what is going on in and around their city. NancyOnNorwalk does not intend to be a print newspaper online; rather, it exists to pull the curtain back and shine a spotlight on how Norwalk is run and what is happening regarding issues that have an impact on taxpayers’ pocketbooks and safety. As an independent site, NancyOnNorwalk’s first and only allegiance is to the reader.

About Nancy

Nancy came to Norwalk in September 2010 and, after reporting on Norwalk for two years for another company, resigned to begin Nancy On Norwalk so she engage in journalism the way it was meant to be done. She is married to career journalist Mark Chapman, has a son, Eric (the artist and web designer who built this website), and two cats – a middle-aged lady and a young hottie who are learning how to peacefully co-exist.