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Norwalk Hospital plans expansion

Screengrab of a document posted on the Norwalk Planning and Zoning pending applications’ webpage.

NORWALK, Conn. — Norwalk Hospital is looking to add to its existing facilities in an effort to provide more comprehensive care to patients in the region.

Norwalk Hospital is located on almost 16 acres of land along Maple Avenue and Stevens Street. The hospital recently became a part of Nuvance Health, which also runs hospitals in Danbury, Waterbury, and New York.

Nuvance has proposed constructing a new nine-story patient building at Norwalk Hospital, which would include, among other upgrades, more medical surgical floors, and a “mother-baby” floor that provides maternal and infant care. The hospital plans to get rid of two structures that are older and move some services off-site.

“The proposal is to create…a brand-new patient pavilion so that Norwalk Hospital can meet the medical needs and health needs of Norwalk residents and those in surrounding communities,” Attorney Liz Suchy, who is representing the hospital, told the Planning and Zoning Commission on Sept. 8.

The new structure would be located where the current community building and Tracey building are located. The hospital is currently moving services out of those structures and shifting them to other buildings on site or moving them to off-site facilities, such as the outpatient behavioral health services, which were moved to 14 Westport Avenue in Norwalk.

The new building would include: a floor with 28 beds for ICU/PCU (intensive care/progessive care unit); two 30-bed medical/surgical floors; expanded women and infants floor; and additional updates. The building would not increase patient beds, but would “modernize the hospital campus and bring 21st century care to its patients and the community it serves,” according to the site plan application.

Steve Ansel, a principal and architect with SLAM Collaborative, which is working on the project, said that the project would “modernize not only the nursing units and patient care areas,” but also bring the hospital up “to a contemporary standard.”

The buildings that the hospital is vacating previously held a pediatrics unit, the outpatient behavioral health that is being moved in Norwalk, and office space. Some of the offices were moved to Danbury when Nuvance Health took over the hospital, such as marketing and clerical staff, Ansel said.

The hospital plans to accommodate about 180 medical, surgical, and ICU beds, with additional space built in to surge to more than 210 if there was a need, Ansel said.

Ansel said that once they get started, construction is projected to take about two years.

The application was before the Norwalk Planning and Zoning Commission for a pre-application review. Planning and Zoning Director Steven Kleppin said that depending on staff reviews and comments, they were planning to put the item up for a public hearing at the commission’s first meeting in October.

Greenwich Hospital is also working toward an upgrade. It has submitted a new proposal for a Smilow Life Cancer Center that would provide “state-of-the-art cancer care, including the most advanced technology in radiation oncology suites and novel therapies in patient-centered infusion spaces,” according to a release from the hospital.

Also on Sept. 8, Greenwich Hospital President Diane Kelly told the Greenwich Planning and Zoning Commission that, “We are talking about a quiet center integrated in our community that delivers improving life [and] extending life-saving cancer care.”

This article originally appeared on Coastal Connecticut Times, founded by Kelly Prinz, formerly Kelly Kultys. Read the original article here

2 comments

Johnny cardamone September 27, 2022 at 8:24 am

I was in the ICU recently with its new 4 pod, 40 beds and I was amazed how busy it was! our community is growing so must our hospital to provide the care of people need. I do have a question; what is happening with the old YMCA that we were told the hospital purchase and could’ve been used in the early days of Covid as some kind of a pandemic hotel of sorts. not to mention the need for care of the homeless and those that are poor.

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