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Norwalk photos: ADHD awareness

From left, Norwalk Deputy Corporation Counsel Jeffry Spahr, Mayor Harry Rilling, State Rep. Lucy Dathan (D-142), State Senate Majority Leader Bob Duff (D-25) and Board of Education member Janine Randolph, Friday in the Norwalk Public Library. (Contributed)

Books displayed in the South Norwalk Public Library on Washington Street. (Norwalk Public Library)

NORWALK, Conn. — City officials met Friday in the Norwalk Public Library to highlight ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).

“ADHD is one of the most common mental health conditions affecting children and adults. But it is often misunderstood. ADHD Awareness Month’s goal is to correct these misunderstandings and to highlight the contributions that those with ADHD bring to our community,” Deputy Corporation Counsel Jeffry Spahr said in a news release.

Spahr outlined his thoughts on ADHD last year in an opinion piece you can find here.

The National Institute of Mental Health states:

“Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is marked by an ongoing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development. People with ADHD experience an ongoing pattern of the following types of symptoms:

  • “Inattention means a person may have difficulty staying on task, sustaining focus, and staying organized, and these problems are not due to defiance or lack of comprehension.
  • “Hyperactivity means a person may seem to move about constantly, including in situations when it is not appropriate, or excessively fidgets, taps, or talks. In adults, hyperactivity may mean extreme restlessness or talking too much.
  • “Impulsivity means a person may act without thinking or have difficulty with self-control. Impulsivity could also include a desire for immediate rewards or the inability to delay gratification. An impulsive person may interrupt others or make important decisions without considering long-term consequences.”

 

Spahr said, “What kids with ADHD need most is a parent who really understands the way their brain is wired, accepts and respects them for all their complexity, believes in their strengths and possibilities, and empowers them to want to reach their full potential (and helps enable them to do so).”

Books displayed in the Norwalk Public Library on Belden Avenue. (Norwalk Public Library)

Books displayed in the South Norwalk Public Library on Washington Street. (Norwalk Public Library)

Books displayed in the South Norwalk Public Library on Washington Street. (Norwalk Public Library)

Books displayed in the South Norwalk Public Library on Washington Street. (Norwalk Public Library)

Books displayed in the South Norwalk Public Library on Washington Street. (Norwalk Public Library)

One comment

David Muccigrosso October 10, 2022 at 11:12 am

I just want to point out that the “misunderstanding” of ADHD is primarily driven by the overdiagnosis and overtreatment problems.

It’s why people think it’s a “made-up” condition, or that it’s just kids misbehaving, or that it makes kids profoundly disturbed, or that shutting them up with medication will fix everything.

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