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Norwalk photos: Juneteenth

Darlene Young and Darius Williams dance Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

NORWALK, Conn. – Norwalk observed Juneteenth as a federal holiday for the first time Saturday, as shown in these photos submitted by Norwalk Public Library Director Sherelle Harris.

President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday that made Juneteenth, a day celebrating the end of American slavery, our 12th national holiday.

Mayor Harry Rilling, Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

“By making Juneteenth a federal holiday, all Americans can feel the power of this day and learn from our history – and celebrate progress and grapple with the distance we’ve come (and) the distance we have to travel,” Biden said.

Norwalk City Hall will be closed Monday. “Essential personnel will still report to work, as they do for other Federally recognized holidays,” the City’s website says. “…The Transfer Station and Yard Waste Site will be open 730am-3pm.  There will be no interruption to City garbage or recycling services. Scheduled evening meetings will also continue to be held remotely.”

“Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day when the last people who were enslaved in the United States were freed,” the website notes. “This day was 2.5 years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.”

Posing Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library are, from left, Lucia Rilling, Dr. Lynne Moore, David Heuvelman, Mary Mann, Barbara Smyth, Mayor Harry Rilling, Darius Williams, Stephanie Thomas and Dominique Johnson in the back, and in the front, Sherelle Harris, Greg Burnett and Janet Evelyn. (Raeven McFadden)

Lynne Moore, Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

Godfrey Azima, Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

Darius Williams and Janet Evelyn, Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

Blues and Beyond band members, Saturday at the SoNo Branch Library. (Raeven McFadden)

2 comments

Mike Lyons June 23, 2021 at 4:11 pm

“Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day when the last people who were enslaved in the United States were freed,” the website notes. “This day was 2.5 years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.”

In fact, for six months after that date legal slavery continued in Delaware and Kentucky, until the 13th Amendment was ratified (on December 6, 1865). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juneteenth

JustaTaxpayer June 24, 2021 at 5:57 am

I’ll admit, I haven’t kept up. Will this be a paid holiday for government employees?

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