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Open letter regarding the antisemitic attacks against Norwalk Common Council

Dear Community of Norwalk, 

We write as three clergy leaders in the community, and as friends who are partnering in projects directed toward dialogue, reconciliation, mutual support, and action supporting the Norwalk community. 

Our hearts are stirred to anger, sadness, and resolve as we learn of further antisemitic attacks in recent weeks directed at Norwalk’s Common Council (reported HERE and HERE). We are grateful for the city leadership’s condemnation of the attack, and we write to support them in holding accountable those perpetrating this vicious behavior. 

As religious leaders, we feel drawn to reiterate the core value of our respective religions — that God created human beings in God’s own image and that we are instructed to “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Leviticus 19:18). Our sacred mission is to see the divinity within each human being and to embrace each human being for who they are. Our traditions teach that God is always drawing the circle of welcome wider than we imagine, and is inviting us to find our common humanity inside it. 

This is a universal value beyond religion or creed. It is how our grandmothers taught us to behave as children, and it is critical that we regain it now. As The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said so well, “We must learn to live together as [siblings] or perish together as fools.”

In solidarity with our fellow Norwalkers, we offer prayers and support during this challenging time as we strive to figure out how to live the love our world needs now.

Dear Community of Norwalk, 

We write as three clergy leaders in the community, and as friends who are partnering in projects directed toward dialogue, reconciliation, mutual support, and action supporting the Norwalk community. 

Our hearts are stirred to anger, sadness, and resolve as we learn of further antisemitic attacks in recent weeks directed at Norwalk’s Common Council (reported HERE and HERE). We are grateful for the city leadership’s condemnation of the attack, and we write to support them in holding accountable those perpetrating this vicious behavior. 

As religious leaders, we feel drawn to reiterate the core value of our respective religions — that God created human beings in God’s own image and that we are instructed to “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Leviticus 19:18). Our sacred mission is to see the divinity within each human being and to embrace each human being for who they are. Our traditions teach that God is always drawing the circle of welcome wider than we imagine, and is inviting us to find our common humanity inside it. 

This is a universal value beyond religion or creed. It is how our grandmothers taught us to behave as children, and it is critical that we regain it now. As The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said so well, “We must learn to live together as [siblings] or perish together as fools.”

In solidarity with our fellow Norwalkers, we offer prayers and support during this challenging time as we strive to figure out how to live the love our world needs now.

Rabbi Ita Paskind

Congregation Beth El

The Rev. Tamara Moreland

First Congregational Church

The Rev. Daniel Simons

St. Paul’s on the Green Episcopal Church 

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