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Opinion: Holding my nose to vote for Q1

Ballot Question
Ballot Question
Terry Cowgill
Terry Cowgill

Terry Cowgill lives in Lakeville, blogs at ctdevilsadvocate.com and is news editor of The Berkshire Record in Great Barrington, Mass. Follow him on Twitter @terrycowgill.

When Connecticut voters walk into their polling places on Nov. 4, they’ll experience an uncommon occurrence: they’ll be voting for more than just candidates for office. For reasons that will be explored later in this column, these sorts of ballot questions are unusual in our state. And this one will be notable for its tautological quality: voters will be voting about . . . voting.

Question 1, perhaps inaptly named since it will be the only one on the ballot, will ask voters to amend the state constitution to allow the General Assembly “to remove restrictions concerning absentee ballots and to permit a person to vote without appearing at a polling place on the day of an election?”

Currently, voters must have a darned good excuse to obtain an absentee ballot. They must be sick on election day, traveling out of range of their hometown, serving in the military or have religious obligations. The amendment would also allow the General Assembly to institute so-called early voting, whereby ballots can be filed days or even weeks before an election.

See the complete story at CT News Junkie.

 

 

 

 

Comments

2 responses to “Opinion: Holding my nose to vote for Q1”

  1. Oldtimer

    Other States, Florida for one, keeps polls open 7 days a week, from 7am to 7pm, for about a month before election day. Their turnouts average 64% with a low of 49% and a high of 79%. Making it easier for voters to vote pays.

  2. EveT

    Connecticut makes it unreasonably difficult to qualify for an absentee ballot. Examples: (1) If you walk with a walker, your Registrar of Voters may consider that not enough of a disability to qualify; (2) If you are scheduled to work out of town on election day, but you don’t report to work until 9 AM, that may not be considered absence from town during all the hours of voting.

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