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Opinion: Kudos to Malloy for not taking the Bay State rail bait

Terry Cowgill
Terry Cowgill

Terry Cowgill lives in Lakeville, blogs at ctdevilsadvocate.com and is news editor of The Berkshire Record in Great Barrington, Mass. Follow him on Twitter @terrycowgill.

It’s an immutable law of physics that the government will always grow and become more expensive, causing our tax burden to grow right along with it. Over the years, I’ve passed up few opportunities to point this out. But when state government shows some restraint even amid public pressure to do otherwise, congratulations are very much in order.

To my pleasant surprise, the Malloy administration and the state Department of Transportation are balking at spending hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade freight lines, currently used by Housatonic Railroad, to bring passenger rail service north from Danbury up to Pittsfield, Mass.

Earlier this month, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation announced it will spend $12 million to acquire that state’s section of the line from the state border at Canaan, Conn., where Housatonic Railroad is headquartered, 37 miles north to Pittsfield in central Berkshire County. The administration of Gov. Deval Patrick has already set aside $113 million for the project.

See the complete story at CT News Junkie.

 

Comments

One response to “Opinion: Kudos to Malloy for not taking the Bay State rail bait”

  1. spanner

    REP. PERONE LAUDS PASSAGE OF BILL
    CREATING A CONNECTICUT PORT AUTHORITY

    I thought this involves the rail system to be improved Perone clearly defines what has to happen for this Port Authority to work.

    Malloy administration and the state Department of Transportation are balking at spending hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade freight lines,

    I do agree with you Terry but you really cant have it both ways now can you?

    Someone must point this out to Dan and Chris.

    Among the nation’s ports, those at New Haven, Bridgeport and the shallow-water Stamford ranked Nos. 44, 72 and 142 in 2009 trade, according to the American Association of Port Authorities.

    If tankers have to start avoiding Connecticut ports altogether, gasoline and heating oil will have to be brought into the state by truck, putting up to 1 million more trucks on I-95 annually, according to the Connecticut Maritime Coalition. I’m not even talking cost of fuel, course it will cost more

    I just not convinced our politicians are thinking things thru.

    New Haven did more than 10.1 million tons in trade — making it the third busiest port in New England — compared to Bridgeport’s 4.6 million and Stamford’s 0.7 million. By comparison, Boston handled 20.5 million tons while New York/New Jersey did 144.7 million

    The work on the ports will take time and money and we are talking a rail already there to allow Ct to prosper maybe more information needs to be produced before this rail project sounds better than Perones plans.Then someone can explain this to Dan.

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