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Potential new Norwalk economic directors interviewed Tuesday

NORWALK, Conn. – Norwalk finally appears close to getting a new economic development director.

Norwalk Mayor Harry Rilling on Tuesday interviewed three potential replacements for the long-gone Tad Diesel, Norwalk’s former business and economic development director, according to Business Advisory Council member Irene Dixon.

“The mayor interviewed everyone today. Two we flew in and one was local,” Dixon said, declining to provide further details.

“We are not in a position to release any further information at this point as no decision has been made,” Rilling said in an email.

Diesel retired shortly after Rilling became mayor in November. In January, Rilling announced the formation of an 11-member Business Advisory Council, which would first come up with a job description for Diesel’s replacement.

“We’ll be looking for somebody who will aggressively market the city of Norwalk by reaching out to potential investors and potential businesses, trying to draw people into Norwalk, showing them our natural resources, showing them what we have to offer and why we are the best place to do business,” Rilling said in January.

A source close to the situation said the Business Advisory Council has interviewed 40 candidates for the job.

The new economic director will work closely with the Norwalk Redevelopment Agency and the Norwalk Chamber of Commerce, but will report to the mayor, Rilling said in January.

 

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2 responses to “Potential new Norwalk economic directors interviewed Tuesday”

  1. piberman

    Everybody knows that 90k doesn’t bring a well experienced economic development professional. Why in Norwalk we have school janitors making almost as much. Stamford didn’t become CT’s only successful major City by hiring someone to “sell the city”. Business folks are far more savvy than local politicos. They’ve been avoiding Norwalk for the same reason our residential properties remain stagnant – high taxes. How do you “sell high taxes”. Even City employees avoid living here.

  2. One and Done.

    Remember when mayors used to do the work described here?

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