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Slippery slope or personal choice? Passion bubbles to surface during assisted suicide hearing

HARTFORD, Conn. – The state has no compelling interest in preventing terminally ill patients from choosing to end their lives, Attorney General George Jepsen told a legislative committee during a hearing Monday.

Jepsen was one of hundreds of people to offer testimony on legislation that would allow a doctor to prescribe lethal medication to a dying patient. This is the second consecutive year the the Public Health Committee has held hearings on such a bill, but Jepsen sponsored similar legislation 20 years ago when he served in the state Senate.

The policy, which has been approved in three other states, is controversial and opponents are concerned that if it passes, terminally ill people may be coerced into suicide. Jepsen said constituents have told him that dying patients already are taking their own lives.

“This happens all the time but it happens in the dark and all the issues that you raise pursuant to coercion are swept under the rug. It would be much better and far more sensitive to bring it to the spotlight where there is an orderly process,” he said.

See the complete story at CT News Junkie.

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2 responses to “Slippery slope or personal choice? Passion bubbles to surface during assisted suicide hearing”

  1. Oldtimer

    “The state has no compelling interest in preventing terminally ill patients from choosing to end their lives” ? This is the opinion of our attorney general ? Is he speaking as the attorney general, giving his legal opinion ? Or, as an advocate for a law legalizing suicide ? If this law is passed, will first responders still be required to do their best to prevent people from jumping off buildings, or bridges ? Will first responders be liable for civil damages for wrestling a lethal weapon out of the hands of a suicidal person intent on taking his own life ? Is it his opinion that our military should be prevented from rescuing badly wounded when they believe they are dying and ask to be left on the field, or worse yet, ask to be mercifully finished off ? I, and many like me, were brought up to believe live is sacred and any life taking is very seriously wrong.

  2. Oldtimer

    Dr. Kevorkian would have loved this bill. Essentially, this bill gives state approval for what he was doing. How many latter-day Kevorkians would this bill enable ? Would the state license them by the year or by the case ?

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