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State law dating back to the ‘70s is responsible for food truck relocation

New location in Guilford. (Jack Kramer photo)
New location in Guilford. (Jack Kramer photo)

HARTFORD, Conn. – For more than a year a familiar site on the south side of the Guilford Green, right across the street from the iconic Page Hardware store, has been the Taqueria Cinco food truck.

No more.

The truck is now located about a quarter-mile away on the less-traveled, north end of the town Green, across the street from the Congregational Church.

Many fans of the food truck are unhappy about the move, but state officials say the truck had been operating in violation of state regulations in its previous location.

See the complete story at CT News Junkie.

Comments

2 responses to “State law dating back to the ‘70s is responsible for food truck relocation”

  1. EveT

    The full article explains that “you can’t operate a business on state roadways.” Fine, but I’d like to know what other state laws regulate food trucks. Do they have to pass the same health inspections as bricks & mortar restaurants? Do they have to pay the same taxes?
    Frankly don’t I understand the cachet of food trucks. Their business model is contingent on burning gasoline, impeding traffic by locating themselves where there is no customer parking, and causing litter as their customers leave food wrappers lying around.

  2. Dawn

    But the food is sometimes better than a sitdiwn restaurant. And cheaper.

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